Journal cover Journal topic
Proceedings of the ICA
Journal topic
Volume 2
Proc. Int. Cartogr. Assoc., 2, 42, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/ica-proc-2-42-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Proc. Int. Cartogr. Assoc., 2, 42, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/ica-proc-2-42-2019
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

  10 Jul 2019

10 Jul 2019

Mobility routing optimization for physical accessibility and thermoregulation

Jeffrey R. Heuwinkel1, Matthew T. Rice1, Manzhu Yu1, Kevin M. Curtin2, and R. Daniel Jacobson3 Jeffrey R. Heuwinkel et al.
  • 1Department of Geography and Geoinformation Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia, USA
  • 2Department of Geography and Laboratory for Location Science, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA
  • 3Department of Geography, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Keywords: accessibility mapping, routing, optimization

Abstract. As routing applications become common on mobile devices, significant problems that remain are the sparse underlying data support for pedestrian-based routing and the inability to customize an existing route for specific individual accessibility needs. Cartographic researchers have repeatedly demonstrated methods for sophisticated modelling of infrastructure and have built routing portals and accessibility systems, yet these systems and their benefits have not been used widely, due to problems with underlying data support. This research reviews a few exemplar systems and presents a new routing study that uses the presence of overhead tree canopy to add a preference layer to individual routing. This allows individuals to plan and choose navigation pathways for purposes of body heat thermoregulation, a problem that exists for many individuals with mobility impairments, particularly those with spinal cord injuries. The study presented here demonstrates that successful routing underneath the tree canopy can be done in a way that only marginally increases the length of such routes. This study also demonstrates the need for detailed geographic data support for preference-based routing.

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